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Customer Centricity

power words that sell

These Power Words Will Evoke Emotion And Make Sales

Copywriting is so much more than typing out a string of words. It influences the human mind and evokes emotion that encourages readers to take action.

Whether that action be to subscribe to an email newsletter, follow a brand’s social media accounts, or ultimately make a purchase – aiming readers in the right direction takes finesse.

All this to say, words are important. Incorporating the right words into your copy can lead to success. Whereas using the wrong words may dissuade a reader from taking action and never convert them into a paying customer. 

At FocusCopy, part of our process is to use power words that sell. Because our success lies in our clients’ success.

Understand The Psychology Behind Power Words

Words are powerful and can strongly influence a person’s life. Moreover, a single word can have a drastic impact on an entire conversation. 

So how do you know which words to use in your copy to reach your goals?

It takes practice, empathy, and a human outlook. At the end of the day, your goal is to invoke emotions that will persuade your audience to take action.

Use These Words To Keep Your Readers At The Forefront

Vague statements directed to every soul on earth don’t invoke much emotion. Use these words to address your specific audience and really bring your reader to the center of your communications.

Are you wondering when you’ll find the time to write copy, much less – include the power words you need to sell your service or product? Contact FocusCopy to find out how we can write copy in your voice to reach your target audience.

You. 

Yes, using the word “you” lets your reader know you are talking to them directly. As a business owner, making the copy about the reader’s wants and needs is critical to building rapport. And using “you” in your copy will bring your reader to the center of your story.

Reader’s Name.

Dear Lauren,

I’m happy to have you here to learn how xyz can not only help you reach your target audience but also help convert them into clients…

OK, I’m interested! First of all, I assume right off the bat that I gave them my information. Once I confirm that this writer didn’t just buy my info from the dark webs, I continue to read their message. Overall, I feel seen as a customer.

We. 

When used correctly, the word “we” can portray a partnership. For instance, “Together, we will get to the root cause of your chronic symptoms to find long-lasting results that work for you.” 

Tips. 

Everyone wants access to insider tips from the experts in their field. If you’re in the business of IT Security, consider blog titles such as “5 Tips To Improve IT Risk Management” or “10 Tips To Prevent A Data Breach”. Not only are these topics that non-IT experts search for on Google, but they are sure to get clicks because people want to protect their businesses and personal data.

Proven. 

Before making an investment, don’t you want to know your money is being spent wisely? We can boast about the incredible benefits of every product and service known to man. However, proven results are the clincher your readers want. 

Success. 

Everyone is looking for successful outcomes in their endeavors. Do you have a service that could help clients’ businesses reach their goals more effectively? If so, then you are in the business of helping other people find success.

Amazing. 

Good, great, wonderful! All these words convey positivity. However, don’t be afraid to boast that your product or service can yield results that will leave the reader feeling amazing.

Save. 

While there are people in this world who care much more about ease than cost, there are far more who care a whole lot about saving money. If your business provides cost-efficient tools for your readers, let them know they can get great results while saving money. I know I’d be interested!

Free. 

To piggyback off of savings, many, many people will opt to try anything free. Why not? No harm, no foul on the consumer if they’re not reaching into their wallet, right? Plus, as long as what you’re offering for free has value, it may just convert some samplers into longtime paying customers.

Simple.

What are we as humans if not constantly striving for simplicity? Fashion choices aside, when it comes to improving our lives, no one wants complicated or complex products or services. 

Long-Lasting Results. 

Results are one thing, but long-lasting results are an entirely different animal. While a myriad of industries can use this, it’s especially true for anyone in the health and wellness world. There are a million and one diet fads out there, but we all know the results only last as long as the diet. It’s those real lifestyle changes that are simple to incorporate and promise long-lasting results that keep people’s interest.

Emphasize Pain Points With These Words

Understanding the pain points of your target audience is key to reaching them on a human-to-human level.

Do you have a clear understanding of your ideal customers’ pain points? If not, then reach out to FocusCopy so we can write copy that will truly show how your product or service can alleviate your audience’s struggles. 

Failure.

While this word is a little harsh on its own, if used correctly, failure can invoke vulnerability from both the writer and reader. Statements such as, “I was running myself ragged to be everything to everyone, yet at the end of the day, nothing was working, and I felt like a total failure.” Ouch! Right? But, we’ve all been there. Whether it be that voice in our head or those of critics – as humans, we have a fear of failure that can either hold us back or propel us forward. 

Vulnerable.

Brene Brown has made a substantial impact in this world by removing the stigma of vulnerability. She defines vulnerability as uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure. It’s a powerful word that reminds us that to be successful, we must put our vulnerable selves out there, risking failure yet hoping for the best. 

Devastating.

Evoking emotion tied to your audience’s pain points means you must empathize with their struggles. If someone has been through anything devastating – loss of data due to a breach, a difficult family situation, or even the death of a loved one – these can all be considered devastating. 

Stress.

It doesn’t matter who you are or where you are from – we all feel stress in our lives. Whether you’re coming from a wellness point of view or discussing the stress of living through a tragic event, it’s something we can all relate to. 

Induce FOMO With Words That Highlight Urgency

The fear of missing out is something we can all understand. Even if we’re not the ones to jump on the bandwagon, we still want to stay privy to what’s going on around us. 

Limited.

Do you have an offer that’s limited by time or quantity? If so, then be sure to tell your audience! There’s nothing like the risk of having something slip through our fingers to make a choice to move forward.

Deadline.

An early-bird deadline to sign up for exclusive offers or savings will for sure get your most interested audience members to take action.

Last Chance.

If anyone in your audience has the slightest interest in what you are offering, then it’s only fair to give them that one last chance. 

Expires.

Ewww expiration – that can be a scary word if you’re thinking about the food in your fridge. But it can also invoke emotion to take action before it’s too late and your audience misses out on the fun. 

New.

We all have that friend who always has the latest model or edition of everything, and it’s normal to feel a little jealous. So imagine if you are offered the newest edition of something you want. Wouldn’t you be intrigued to give it a try?

Let FocusCopy Take The Task Off Your Plate

Running a business is no small feat – it takes time, money, and energy. If you’re too busy focusing on the inner workings of your business, let FocusCopy take over your task of writing copy.

Websites, blogs, newsletters, social media, and so on are all crucial to the success of your business. However, they each need to contain content that is effective in converting readers to paying customers. At FocusCopy, we hone in on your brand voice to create content that your audience will recognize but will also grow your business. Ready to get started? Reach out to FocusCopy today!

Focus Your Copy On Conversation & Conversion

Let’s Grab A Virtual Coffee With Us To Discover How To Boost Your Words
Write A Strong Hook

7 Steps To Write A Strong Hook In Your Copy To Keep Your Audience Engaged

Did you know your hook could be all it takes to capture your target audience’s attention, even if you don’t consider yourself a great writer?

In fact, all it takes is some creativity and keeping your readers at the forefront.

Whether you’re illustrating the pain points you can alleviate or sharing a personal story, you want to connect to your readers on a human level. This is what pushes that, “Oh my gosh, I totally relate!” sentiment to convert readers to paying customers.

Keep Readers’ Eyes On The Page With Intriguing Hooks

Writing content to promote your business isn’t always easy. But what’s even worse is if the people you’re writing for aren’t reading your copy. It’s frustrating, feels like a setback, and can get your mind spinning about what you should be doing differently. But sometimes, all you need is to rework your hook.

Need a little help coming up with the perfect hook? We can help craft a message specifically for your target audience.

What Is A Hook Anyways & Why Should I Care About It?

There’s a good chance you’ve heard the term “hook” in discussions about writing. It’s that opening line that keeps your eyes moving down the page to learn more. 

Otherwise, a swipe of the finger will have them reading or watching something else. And if they’re searching for something specific, you may have pushed them to move on to what your competitors are offering.

How To Write A Strong Hook Your Audience Wants To Read

The most important aspect in getting your message across is to write copy your audience actually wants to read. And we’re here to help you capture attention so you can continue spreading your message and growing your business. 

1. Speak To Your Ideal Clients Or Audience

Do you know who your ideal audience is?

These are the people your business is made for. 

They have problems that you can solve through your product or service. You saw a need and went into business to provide a solution. Now, all you have to do is get people to realize they don’t just need the product – they need your product. 

Suppose your business primarily targets women in executive positions. In that case, you may state, “As an ambitious woman busy crashing glass ceilings, is your life revolving around other people’s needs while you’re left with never-ending to-do lists?”

Here you’ve called out your target – ambitious women. And you’ve humanized their personal needs and let them know that you can relate. Any career-driven woman chasing ambitions on top of caring for children and running all the errands will be excited to read what life-changing solutions you are offering.   

2. Raise Eyebrows With Shocking Statistics Or Going Against The Grain

We’re not encouraging click-bait, but instead, consider how you can raise ‘brows by going against the grain. Something different, quirky, startling, or surprising that will set you apart from the tons of blogs and articles out there. 

In your search bar, simply type in your keyword + statistics (or stat or stats). Before you know it, you’ll have a variety of data to choose from. So find something relevant that speaks to your target audience, and it will lock in their attention to read past the first line of your copy. 

As an example, consider the many new, toxin-free cosmetic lines available in the U.S. Type in: toxic cosmetics + statistics = “Since 2009, 595 cosmetics manufacturers have reported using 88 chemicals, in more than 73,000 products, that have been linked to cancer, congenital disabilities, or reproductive harm.” If you were in the market for safer cosmetics and skincare, would you keep reading?

Don’t have time for research and writing? Find out how FocusCopy can take writing off your hands and help your business grow. 

3. Illustrate Pain Points That Alert Readers To A Threat Or Urgent Warning

Without realizing something was lacking in your industry, would you have started your business in the first place? The pain points in our lives are what drive innovations and new businesses. 

Don’t be afraid to push on those pain points to alert your readers to threats they need to know about. 

For instance, imagine you are selling umbrellas that wick away water and dry off quickly. Before and during hurricane season, you can warn your audience of upcoming bad weather. 

In this instance, your hook may be, “With a week’s worth of rain heading our way, don’t let a soggy umbrella soak everything in your purse and the floor of your office or home.” You are helping them with a heads up about the upcoming rain and offering a preemptive solution to their chronic, weather-related pain point.

4. Keep It Relevant & Confirm Beliefs

Sometimes with creativity also comes the need to reign it in!

You could have the catchiest phrase you’re dying to use, but if it’s not relevant – you may have fallen off course. After all, you need to keep the focus on what you’re offering and who would actually purchase your product or service.

Another proven method to make that needed emotional connection is to confirm your reader’s beliefs. Imagine you own a tire company but many of your potential customers don’t know what they need. 

You could write, “Tired of the tire salesman trying to frighten you into purchasing the most expensive set on their floor? We’re tired of watching our friends and family get scammed. That’s why we started TrustyTires. The only tire provider whose goals are to keep you safe and save you money.”

5. Factor In FOMO Worth FOMOing

The fear of missing out is such a universal feeling that the acronym FOMO caught on quickly and swept social media by storm.

There’s nothing like FOMO to get us googling. Whether or not we end up jumping on the bandwagon, we want to be in the know. 

So hit your audience with curiosity punches that will get them wondering, “What am I missing out on and how could finding out improve my life?”

Consider a super affordable wash and fold laundry service. For apartment dwellers who are paying $2-$3 per machine, this may come out to only an extra dollar or two more than what they’re spending on DIY laundry anyways. 

With so many people living in apartments, the benefits are bound to cause FOMO in jealous neighbors. Consider a hook similar to, “Are you wondering how your neighbor with kids has time to do everything and keep their house clean? Save time and your sanity by letting us take on the laundry so you can have more time to focus on what matters the most.”

Passing on the chore of laundry may be the most FOMO thing worth FOMOing about to your audience, so let them know!

6. Don’t Be Afraid To Get Personal & Vulnerable Through Storytelling 

Too many times, people only present the successes that came after their hardships. But that’s not the way to create an emotional connection with your audience. 

Is there a story behind your passion? Was it something that happened to you as a child? Or maybe in your previous career?

Don’t be afraid to get personal and share the vulnerabilities that got you where you are today. Whether that’s from a hard upbringing, challenges at a previous job, or just one day or instance when things weren’t great. More people can relate to your vulnerable side than your successful one. 

And maybe your story isn’t as heart-tugging as others you’ve heard, but that is ok! There are so many people in the world searching for someone to relate to their struggles. So be the voice to the voiceless and embrace how you got to where you are today.  

7. Back Up Statements You Portray As Facts

While this might be last on our list, it is certainly not the least. This is because your credibility is the most important thing you have to offer.

Shocking statements to grab your readers’ attention is great – but make sure you’re not falling away from any truths. Nowadays, fact-checkers are quick to call out anyone who even strays from the straight and narrow. 

Don’t let creativity take away from your credibility. Hook your target audience with vulnerable stories or surprising statistics. And most importantly, back up statements you are portraying as facts. Either with statistics, a quote directly from the source, or just owning your own truths. 

While this will protect your credibility, it will also help it grow. Wouldn’t it be great if your audience began using you as a source for what they need to know? Not only does this build brand awareness and loyalty, but all those extra clicks on your website won’t hurt either. 

Don’t Have The Time To Write Your Own Hooks & Copy? 

If getting into the groove of writing doesn’t fit in your busy schedule, FocusCopy can help. 

We help businesses in every stage identify their target audience. Then we craft copy to get the message across. From writing the hooks to closing the deals, your to-do list is overwhelming. Let the experts at FocusCopy do what we do best – helping businesses grow.

Ready to get back to focusing on what’s most important? Contact us today to get started.

Focus Your Copy On Conversation & Conversion

Let’s Grab A Virtual Coffee With Us To Discover How To Boost Your Words
Copywriting Help Your Business

How Does Professional Copywriting Help Your Business Grow?

You have your product, a clear idea of what it does, how it helps people, and the price of sale.

And you have all the numbers, figures, facts, and marketing strategies all brainstormed and laid out. 

Even though you keep seeing recommendations to hire a copywriter or are studying writing techniques yourself, you aren’t placing too much stock into the idea. 

After all, words are just words. Right? They’re easy enough to put down. Even though it’s been a while since high school English and freshman composition class, you send texts and emails every day. So putting together a few sentences about your product and uploading them to your website should be plenty. 

You’ve also budgeted for social media ads that you’re feeling confident about writing yourself. After all, isn’t it really the product that matters most and not the advertising attached? 

So, you move forward with your launch. It’s an exciting moment! You’ve been working your way up to this point for quite some time, and you’re ready to help people and change the world. 

However, after a few months, you aren’t making many sales. In fact, it doesn’t seem like your web traffic is even breaking more than a few visitors a day. Or maybe you’re having the opposite problem. Maybe your ads are getting a lot of clicks, but no one is making the purchase.

What gives? 

It’s Not What You’re Saying – It’s How You’re Saying It

Believe it or not, you do need more than a few sentences on your website or advertisement to actually convince people to buy your offer. 

Now, you’re spending extra hours in the morning and late into the night learning about copywriting because it keeps coming up as the missing piece to your success

But, “what even is copywriting? Isn’t that like a trademark?” You think to yourself. 

Copywriting is a powerful form of marketing that has been used for more than two centuries. Even if the practice has looked different throughout the passing of time, copywriting’s goal has remained largely the same. 

The end goal? To close sales, of course! But when done well, copywriting can even position your business and brand as leaders in your industry – making you stand out from the competition and rise to the top. Your customers’ problems are solved, and your dream of having a successful business is accomplished. 

Therefore, it’s really no surprise that copywriting can help your business thrive. Because no matter its form, the aim is always to move prospective customers closer to hitting that “Order Now” button on your website. 

4 Ways Professional Copywriting Can Help Your Business

Copywriting – not to be confused with copyrighting – encompasses many different parts of a marketing strategy. So, it’s easy to understand how you might feel a little unsure at first how it can actually help your business. 

At the most basic definition, copywriting is any piece of writing or content you might find on a website, billboard advertisement, newspaper ad, and even a flyer you receive in the mail. 

Copywriting is also part of commercial advertising (if you’re still watching cable television these days), as well as slogans, catchphrases, and infomercials. 

Really, copywriting is everywhere, and has been for quite some time!

Nowadays, thanks to so many businesses moving online, it’s especially beneficial for businesses both new, old, large, and small. In the digital realm, copywriting takes the shape of sales letters, email newsletters, social media posts, blog content, video scripts, and more. 

From coffee roasters to law firms, no matter your industry, product, or service, copywriting acts like support beams to your entire foundation. It helps you solidify your mission and message, connect with your audience, and grab the attention of those who’ve never heard of you. 

1. Copywriting Improves SEO & Increases Organic Traffic

Recently, you’ve been looking for new desks through Google. So, you’ve been searching for things like, “best desks for home office” and you immediately have a wide variety of beautiful desks in front of you. 

You click on one of the first few websites that come up because they grabbed your attention. 

Well, that’s copywriting (and a little SEO strategy) in action. Not only does copywriting help your website actually show up in search results from Google, but that brief little description underneath the website link was written by a copywriter. You knew almost exactly what you would find before you even clicked on the link. 

But, maybe you want to learn more about this specific brand’s furniture. You might not find it featured prominently, but if you dig around a little, there’s a good chance you’ll find a section dedicated to Blogs. 

Why is that, you might wonder? Well, blogs are a form of copywriting that actually serve two big purposes. 

Blogs Offer Free & Valuable Information

First of all, blogs are a way for brands to provide valuable information to their customers – which often leads to better B2B or B2C conversions. 

Maybe you want to know how the desk you’re thinking about buying was made. Look through their blog, and find the piece that covers their whole assemblage process! 

Maybe you care about the environment and you want to be sure the desk is constructed with sustainable materials. In their blog section, you’ll probably find articles detailing their commitment to sustainability. 

See what’s happening here? You had questions and their blog has already provided you with the answers. So, essentially, the goal of blogs is to address your questions, needs, and concerns in greater detail. 

What kind of business would you most likely purchase a desk from? The one that has a lot of information available about their desks and products? Or the one that has nothing but a desk and a check-out button? 

This example can be applied to a lot of different kinds of businesses and industries. 

Need to schedule a dental appointment but you can’t choose between two different offices to call? 

While one has good reviews, you can’t find anything about their services, pricing, or commitment to providing you a good, pain-free experience. The other office, however, has full-on articles and FAQs about ways in which their dentists help you through dental anxiety – which, (we know the feeling, believe us) is something you’ve struggled with since you were a kid. 

So which office has closed the deal and earned your call? I’ll let you decide! 

Blogs Boost SEO 

The value of blogs doesn’t end with informational content for your customers. You see, the only reason you clicked on that website with all the desks in the first place, was because of a little thing called SEO

SEO, or Search Engine Optimization, is like putting up highway markers leading to your business. Picture the interstate highway system lined with every furniture store on the internet. If you just type in “furniture store online” into Google’s search bar, you’re going to find a lot of results. 

That’s because all of these businesses have put up signs that say something like, “This is a furniture store. We sell furniture here.” 

But let’s say you type in “furniture stores near me.” Now, your search is going to be more localized. You may have fewer results, and the stores will specifically be in your area. 

Can you guess why? 

The furniture stores near you have indicated to Google that they sell furniture in a certain area. They probably have a physical storefront, as opposed to furniture stores that sell exclusively online. 

But how did they get Google to register their business in a certain area, and understand what it is that they sell? 

For this part, look through their website! 

What words do you see on their page? If they have a blog, what kind of topics are they writing about? 

When a business wants to show up on search engines for certain phrases or search queries, they use copywriting to incorporate those words into their web pages or blog content. 

This signals to Google to show their business for the keywords people are searching for. 

Simple enough, right? 

Well, good SEO doesn’t quite end here. 

Word Count & Quality Content 

You see, the more content a business uploads each month, the more web traffic it generally will receive – which makes sense if you think about it. 

The more signs they put up on the highway, the more road trippers start to recognize their brand and offers. 

We won’t get too technical here. Generally speaking, blog content with a word count of a thousand words or more is thought to be “quality content” in Google’s eyes. While word counts of two thousand words or more will yield even better results for your website. 

In fact, there have been several studies from notable content marketing agencies over the past two years that have done deep dives into the correlation between word count and SEO results

However, the content must be quality. This means well-researched, well-formatted, and well-written! You shouldn’t expect grammatical errors, spelling mistakes, or incomplete thoughts to bring in much organic traffic. 

Additionally, you should never copy and paste someone else’s entire work onto your website or blog content. Seriously, don’t. 

Google has ways of recognizing bad content that’s just trying to game the system and will punish your website link by making it more difficult to find or remove it from its results completely. 

Ready to have a steady stream of quality content up on your website? Schedule a discovery call with FocusCopy, and we’ll take the content process off your plate. Freeing up your time to focus on your clients, business, and personal life. 

2. Copywriting Builds Relationships With Your Audience & Fosters Community

Brands and businesses benefit a lot from having an active online community. 

For example, do you want constant feedback on your offer? Having an online community to engage with on social media allows you to easily take stock of customer opinions. 

Additionally, you can get to know your customers on a more personal level, which helps you better serve their needs (more on that later). 

Copywriters can help your business build an online community by creating email newsletters, content pillars, and by giving away free information such as the content on your blog. 

Content pillars are like ebooks or in-depth articles about specific topics in your industry. The goal is to provide value to customers even if they don’t all make a purchase. 

Encouraging visitors to sign up for your newsletter allows you to communicate directly with your customers through their email inboxes. But you need a persuasive subject line and copy to really convince customers to take action on your promotion or offer. 

3. Copywriting Speaks To Your Customer Needs 

Understanding your customer needs is a big part of having a successful business. And it can mean several things. 

For example, your customers are more likely to respond to brand voices that they connect with or relate to. Copywriters are effective at capturing brand voices and speaking your customer’s languages

And once you’re speaking your customers’ language, you know their goals, problems, and where they are mentally and emotionally. 

Because even though copywriting is about closing more sales – it does this by solving customer problems. Effective copywriting does this by making your customers feel heard, understood, and that your business cares about helping them. 

Let’s solve problems together. Schedule a discovery call with us, and we’ll help you make your business vision a reality.  

4. Copywriting Strengthens Your Power Of Persuasion 

The purpose of copywriting is ultimately to drive customers and users to action. 

Whether that be signing up for your newsletter and email list, following you on social media, or of course, choosing to buy one of your products. Good copywriting leads your customers through a funnel. Until, eventually, you close a sale! 

The more effective your copy and research, the more likely you are to generate revenue. However, good copy still needs a quality product or service to offer potential customers. 

The most persuasive copy won’t help you if customers are leaving bad reviews about your product and telling all their friends and family about their horrible experience. 

Increase Your Conversions With Focused Copy 

Your business deserves to be on your customers’ radars. You’ve put time, money, and a lot of effort into making a service and product that actually helps people and improves their lives for the better. 

Don’t you want the best team of copywriters at your side, supporting you each step of the way? Contact us today, and together, we’ll develop a plan to tackle each one of your business’s objectives.

Focus Your Copy On Conversation & Conversion

Let’s Grab A Virtual Coffee With Us To Discover How To Boost Your Words
mistakes business owners make

Top 10 Mistakes Business Owners Make When Copywriting Themselves

As a business owner, you have a lot on your plate. But avoiding inevitable mistakes business owners make when it comes to copywriting is essential. While writing for your business may seem like a small task and the least of your worries, it affects how people view you and your services.

Ask yourself… How many times have you come across something poorly written or executed, and you simply want to give up on the entire purchase? 

Whether you were looking at a menu at a restaurant or a website for a service you need, you likely didn’t stay long enough to see more. Every day, spelling mistakes, errors, funky layouts, and so much more cause readers to move on to a company’s competitors. If your business has old copy full of misinformation and mistakes, you could be losing out on revenue.

While it may not feel fair, people turn elsewhere because they don’t take businesses seriously when business owners make mistakes within their copywriting.

We’ve got the art of writing for websites, blogs, and numerous other assets down. But we realize not everyone knows what to avoid.

Read on for more information about mistakes business owners make when writing their own deliverables.

Too short on time to write for yourself? Give us a shout and get started right away.

Top 10 Mistakes Business Owners Make When Copywriting

Some of your most prized characteristics as a business owner can end up being your downfall when it comes to copywriting. Whether you’re a perfectionist or focused on being super-efficient, it may not be the best approach to take when writing. 

It’s a hard pill to swallow, but it’s true! 

We’ll walk you through each step and talk about the things that could get in the way of your writing.

1. Proofread Or Don’t Publish At All

We know we sound like a broken record, but it truly is important to proofread and pinpoint any errors you can find.

It helps to read your own text out loud and see if you can find any common mistakes business owners make along the way. Remember when we mentioned people judge your business based on the way it presents itself? According to RealBusiness, nearly three-quarters of web users pay attention to the quality of copy on a business’s website.

What To Look Out For:

  • Spelling
  • Grammar
  • Flow
  • Incorrect use of capitalization
  • Punctuation
  • Sentence structure
  • Acronyms not easily recognized by your audience

While not everyone reads with thorough deliberation, people are still paying attention. Proofreading is especially important if you’re passing along information that requires it to be correct. This means, being one digit off on your contact number or a period mark shy of a complete email address could set your potential customers into a frenzy of confusion when trying to reach you.

Could they look it up elsewhere and find the correct information themselves? Sure. But they shouldn’t have to when they’re relying on you to give them the information they need. They may start to think that if you can’t be trusted to offer the right information, why should they trust you with their business? 

Don’t leave it up to your customers to decide whether your company can be trusted and proofread before hitting publish on your marketing assets. 

2. Bring The Focus Back To The Customer

Oftentimes, we notice that businesses get so excited about what they have to offer, that they forget why they’re in business in the first place. And with a whopping 63% of consumers (76% for B2B buyers) who expect your business to know their unique needs and expectations, there’s little room for error.

But it’s my business. So shouldn’t the writing be about me and my business? Isn’t that what my customers care about?

No, not really. This can be one of the toughest realizations business owners have to deal with, but it’s important to say. 

Your customers care about what you can do for them. Talking about yourself, your story, image, and even community involvement are going to be pretty useless in the long run if you don’t remember to think about your business as serving others.

Too much of you isn’t always a good thing. You’ll bury your customers and lose your initial goal.

If you’re reading your existing or drafted copy and start to think it’s looking a little saturated with your business and less about your customer, take a step back. This doesn’t mean you need to scrap everything you’ve written. You can use that information for newsletters, email updates, and other marketing materials. 

But if you know you need to pull the focus back towards the customer, try these few steps and ask:

  1. What do you do?
  2. Why do you do it?
  3. What’s the reason someone should care?
  4. Why again? (Yep, repeat the above step.)

It’s easy to lose focus when writing material for your business, but do what you can to bring it back to your customers.

Need help revising and reaching the main goal? We’re the team with the know-how to help.

3. Features Are Not Benefits

Like focusing too much on yourself, writing about the features of your business can cut into how it can benefit someone. 

For example, if you’re a brand new hospital opening in a busy neighborhood, you may be inclined to say things like:

  • Large Parking Lot
  • Plenty Of Staff
  • Daily Appointments Available
  • Fully Staffed Cafeteria
  • Innovative Machinery

All of these things don’t sound horrible. But they also don’t map out the genuine benefits to someone who may need to go to this hospital. All of these things are features rather than benefits.

A few ways these can transform into benefits include saying:

  • Easy Access And Private Parking Lot Off I-72
  • 2:1 Patient Ratio With Friendly Staff
  • Short Wait Times For All Appointments
  • Healthy And Affordable Food In A Fully Staffed Cafeteria
  • $80 Million In Updated And Innovative Machinery

With these examples, you’re giving your readers details about your features combined with benefits without bogging them down with too much information. Take a look at your writing and see if you can spruce up any of your features and transform them into benefits.

4. Look At The Big Idea

Your benefits, business plan, and everything in between includes great information. However, try to avoid getting distracted from the bigger picture. What is it that you want to accomplish? Stick to your end goal and ensure you have Call-To-Actions (CTAs) throughout your writing that match your goal.

Before writing, consider your big picture. Some examples of this could look like the following:

  • Are you looking for more social media followers? 
  • Do you want to inform people about who you and your business are?
  • Is there a product you’re pushing that you want people to buy?
  • Are you attempting to establish a voice?

Whatever your goal is, it should reflect in your writing. This leads us right into one of the next critical mistakes business owners make when copywriting.

5. You Forget One Or More Call-To-Actions

If your writing doesn’t include Call-To-Actions (CTAs), you’re missing out big time. According to Wordstream, “Emails with a single call-to-action increased clicks 371% and sales 1,617%.“

What Is A Call-To-Action?

A Call-To-Action, or CTA, is a button or clickable link that says “Buy Now” or “Call Us Today”. They’re buttons that inspire your reader to take action right away. Without them, you’re forcing your reader to search further to take action with extra steps. Customers want their experience to be as easy as possible. If you’re asking them to do it on their own, they may talk themselves into taking action later, compare by going elsewhere, and so on. You want them to have the option to make a decision right away after they’ve read your compelling copy.

6. Avoid Hitting Publish And Forgetting About It Altogether

Once you choose to publish your copy, you may think you’re good to go for many years into the future. This is just not true. You need to tap into engagement and get feedback from your audience to find out if there is room for improvement.

Don’t get us wrong, publishing your copy is a big step and is a huge cause for celebration. Especially if you have copy you’ve been working on for a long time, trust us, we’re toasting with you on finishing! But don’t forget to check back on it every so often and ensure the messaging, Call-To-Action, and everything else still rings true.

If you’ve changed your business model in a significant way, have new products available, or anything else that needs to be addressed, do so in your copy by updating it regularly. Revisit your copy if it’s been a while and you feel it may be outdated. Finally, double and triple-check to ensure everything looks good and is mobile friendly. 

7. Perfectionism Kills Potentially Great Copy

As a business owner, you’re probably a little bit obsessed with perfection. And there’s nothing wrong with that! When it comes to running your business, having a type-A tendency is a must. But when it comes to copywriting, it can be an absolute nightmare.

Why? Because when you keep writing, saving, going back to writing, and so on, expecting it to be perfect, you’ll never get it done! And you’ll have likely missed your window for getting your message out there at the right time.

We know it’s easier said than done, but let go a little and get your copy out there once you’ve hit all of the important aspects of your bigger picture.

8. Keep It Simple

You work within your industry, but chances are, most people reading your copy don’t. They may even know nothing about your business, who you are, or what you do. So it’s important to write as if you’re speaking to someone who knows little to nothing, which may mean cutting out complicated text or technical jargon.

We get it! You don’t want to have to feel as though you need to “dumb down” your copy because you believe your audience is smart. And that may be true! But for someone who is new to your business or may not be within the same industry you are, too much high-level text can be intimidating and throw someone off from reading what you have to say.

In addition, making the text too complicated can lead your audience to your competitors. Keep it simple and make it easy to follow.

9. You’re Keeping Your Copy Too Top-Secret

In other words, don’t be shy about your copy! Give it to a second pair of eyes to take a look at and make sure you’re moving in the right direction.

Similar to perfectionism, you may be hesitant to share your copy with others until it’s done. But additional members of your team can help identify errors and make suggestions.

Because they’re seeing your writing for the first time, they’ll be able to read it as a consumer and know if it’s sending the right message. Choose someone you trust for this task. Whether it’s a co-owner, manager, or someone else who has a little bit of writing experience. Trust select members of your team and let them help you.

Furthermore, be careful about sharing your copy with too many people. One or two opinions are helpful. Any more than that may begin to cloud your judgment and produce conflicting ideas or suggestions.

10. You Aren’t Really Proving Your Point

Here’s where your previous experience and past results come in handy. In other words, if you have a point to make, then prove it with facts and figures. This may mean you need to dig into your revenue files, ask your financial department, or search for information online. But it’s worth it if it’s impressive.

Are you attempting to convince someone to buy your start-up product? Let them know you’ve made over $5 million in sales in the past year.

Would you like people to put a little more faith in your services? Let them know you have a 4.5-star rating on Google, Yelp, or any other review sites. 

It’s okay to brag about yourself a little to prove a point and convince others to trust in your business. Feature your highlights in places like main headlines, subheadings, or callouts. Keep in mind that these are likely the areas of your writing that they’ll read when scanning your text.


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Experiential Branding

Experiential Branding with Go Savvy: Building Brand Equity

ALL businesses have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. For some, the impacts have been minor. But for others, there is major interruption of normal business practices driving the need for dramatic shifts in event plans and innovative financial strategizing. 

How Can Businesses Persist Through The Pandemic?

If you haven’t been impacted in a major way by the current state of affairs, you probably know someone else who has. 

My good friend and referral partner Savannah Becerril is the founder of Go Savvy – an experiential event planning company known for its savvy organization of creative and memorable events for businesses in the Houston area. As you can imagine, she orchestrated several swift shifts in event plans in the past couple weeks due to coronavirus. 

We’re all doing our part to flatten the curve. COVID-19 is a serious public health threat. It’s essential to respect federal, state, and local mandates by putting a pause on public gatherings (at least for the next 1-2 months). But for many, in-person events are the cornerstone of their businesses. 

So how can businesses host safe and successful events in the midst of social-distancing? 

Postponing is one option. Thankfully, Go Savvy works with a network of supportive vendors, sponsors, and speakers, so they were able to successfully postpone all the events that could be postponed. 

But what about the majority of businesses who don’t have the same level of support? Many have taken on financial losses and/or are experiencing setbacks in their company goals. 

This past week, Savannah and I put our heads together to talk about ways we could help companies persist through this pandemic. 

If your business or a business you know is looking to generate positivity and persistence, then there is no better time to start experiential branding. This creative marketing approach can help businesses make a positive post-pandemic comeback. 

What is Experiential Branding?

Experiential branding (a.k.a. engagement marketing) is a relatively new marketing term. Typically, when we think about company events, we imagine things like networking events or trade shows – events where sometimes the only thing enticing members to attend is the alcohol, evening networking mixers, or parties. 

On the opposite end of the spectrum is experiential branding – it provides meaningful brand-centered experiences for attendees. While it sounds like event marketing, the experience doesn’t always have to be at an event. There are ways to create experiences without gathering in-person!

Now is the perfect time to spark your creative energy and make an experiential branding plan. 

Capitalize on Your Down-Time

American business leaders constantly race to meet deadlines. Now that we’ve been forced to slow down, we are quickly becoming professional couch potatoes. Put down the remote. Take a break from Netflix and Disney+ to take advantage of that time instead. Don’t let the opportunity of time pass by!

Here’s how you can start capitalizing on your downtime to recover your business.

3 Steps to Recover From Coronavirus-Impacted Events

There is a light at the end of this coronavirus tunnel. In these uncertain times, you can still take certain measures to recover from COVID-19’s impact on your business. 

1. Piece Together Your Path Forward

First, determine whether your events should be postponed, canceled, or moved online. Here’s how to decide on the best path forward.

When To Cancel

Although Go Savvy prefers to postpone events, they understand it isn’t always a wise or cost-effective decision. 

Was your event seasonal-themed? 

If so, it might not make sense to postpone the event into a different season. A Spring Fashion Showcase wouldn’t have the same allure for attendees in August when they’re already anticipating Fall looks. It’s better to cut your losses. 

When To Postpone

When your event isn’t centered around a time-sensitive theme but gathering in-person is still essential, postponing is in everyone’s best interest. 

Speakers, sponsors, staff, vendors, and attendees who were excited for your event will be thankful they can still attend later. Your event could fare the same or even better a couple months down the road when public gatherings resume.

When To Go Virtual

If your event was going to happen in-person, but the theme of the event wasn’t tied to a specific time or place, going virtual is a very lucrative option. 

You’ll be able to bypass any uncertainties in rescheduling with venues and expand your audience to a larger geographic area – world wide if you choose! 

At any other point in history, being together while being apart would be an anomaly. But modern technology has made it possible. We have an array of free and fun online platforms at our disposal. Put them to use!

2. Communicate Event Changes Effectively

After you’ve decided on your event changes, you’ll need to create a plan to communicate them effectively. 

The way you communicate with your community will make all the difference in your recovery success. For tips on this, check out last month’s blog post on communicating through coronavirus. In order of importance, communicate with your planner, vendors, and then finally the attendees. 

Reach Out To Venue & Vendors

Review your venue and vendor contracts. Make sure there are options available during emergency and global situations like COVID-19. If not, take this as an opportunity to work with your venue and vendors to renegotiate terms that can work well for all parties.

Have A Sensitive & Strategic Refund Policy

If you cancel your event, make sure to offer a refund to all parties involved. Even if you decide on postponing, you should offer this option too. Offering a refund provides more transparency and trust for your brand – building brand equity. 

However, in the case of rescheduled events, the key is to offer a refund but not to streamline it. This will make it clear that you’re still excited and positive about hosting the future event while still being sensitive to attendees and vendors’ financial circumstances. Most people who truly support your event will bypass requesting a refund and wait for your event’s new date.

Keep Attendees In The Loop

In the case of canceled events, keep your community in the loop about what factored into your decision. They’ll be grateful that your business is committed to taking public safety seriously. Spin the situation as positively as possible by directing them to other events that you have on queue in the future.  

For rescheduled events, you’ll want to keep your current audience and grow it before the new date. Keep the excitement and anticipation alive! Social media and web presence are key here. That’s why now is a crucial time to invest in your business marketing.

Traffic & Conversion Summit postponed their annual summit for entrepreneurs and digital marketers to later in the year. BUT they also put together a virtual summit (which you can still access on their Facebook page) for everyone to view. They already had the content from years past; they just had to package it to build even more hype for the postponed event. 

3. Improve Event Experience

Seeing the good in this very grim situation isn’t easy. But here’s a silver lining: this situation presents an opportunity to improve your event experiences

Think back to when you first started planning your event. Was there something you initially expected to include that didn’t make the cut? Did you discover something exciting to add to the event, but it was too late? Well, now is your opportunity! 

And one of the most optimal ways to improve your business events during these uncertain times is through experiential branding.

Why Companies Need to Invest in Experiential Branding in 2020 and Beyond

Experiential branding will undoubtedly be a useful tool to help businesses persist through the pandemic and recover after the smoke has cleared. Here’s what it will empower you to do…

Grow Client Relationships Through Digital Interactions

What many businesses don’t know is that they can grow their client relationships without a physical gathering. 

You can do this through digital interactions – and not just virtual events. Think hashtags, brand-themed social media camera filters, or virtually-driven community challenges. These are all ways to create digital experiences around company products, services, and values that will get your clients involved.

A creative digital interaction that provides your clients with a meaningful experience will grow their affinity toward your brand and make them more likely to spread the word to others.

Encourage Emotional Engagement With Your Brand

What kind of emotion do you want people to associate with your brand? If you haven’t considered this question, you’re missing out on a vital way to engage with your audience. 

The right experiential branding experience can encourage your audience to feel happy, motivated, relieved, empowered, or inspired.

The more emotionally engaged your clients are, the more memorable your brand will be. If the emotional experience is impactful, you’re on your way to fostering brand loyalty. 

Gain Media Momentum 

Experiential branding can often take the form of public art installations or stunts –  either in the real world or online. If your business is looking for a way to generate buzz, this is a great way to get people talking!

The more creative your experiential branding event is, the more buzz you’ll generate. With the right experiential event planner, businesses can maximize this approach to keep anticipation high for rescheduled events or to introduce new products and services in the future.


Meet Savannah Becerril of Go Savvy

Meet Savannah Becerril, founder of Go Savvy. She is a dear friend of mine, a graduate of the Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship (the same program I graduated from), a client, and a referral partner. We do a lot together, and there is no one I would rather trust with my event planning and experiential branding than her. Please check out her site at gosavvy.biz and follow her on social media. 

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Building a Unique Selling Proposition

During the holiday season, we are bombarded with advertisements, sales, and deals. It can be overwhelming and just plain annoying. This year (2019), I received a staggering 238 emails about Black Friday and Cyber Monday alone. 

As a copywriter, I usually read every email to see what other companies are doing; however, this influx of emails beat me.  

All that being said, there’s a lot of noise. And you have to do something different if you want to stand out from the crowd. Cue today’s topic… You need to start building a unique selling proposition. 

First, what is a unique selling proposition?

What is a Unique Selling Proposition? 

A unique selling proposition or USP is a statement of what makes your business unique and ultimately valuable to your prospective customer or target audience. Essentially, it answers the questions… How are you better than your competition? Or Why should the customer choose you over your competition? 

This is the secret weapon that a lot of marketing strategies forget about or don’t spend enough time on. 

Think of building a unique selling proposition as laying the foundation for your entire business.

Unique Selling Proposition vs Value Proposition

Before we go any further, let’s clear up a few things when it comes to the difference between a unique selling proposition vs value proposition. 

A value proposition describes what your company is offering, to whom you are offering it to, and how it solves your customer’s problem. For example, you can use the following framework to build your value proposition.

We sell [your product or service] to [your customer] to solve [their problem]. We solve this problem by [your solution with the big differentiators].

In comparison, a unique selling proposition is a statement that explains how your product or service uniquely solves your customer’s needs. It is a specific statement that can vary slightly between landing pages, offers, and promotions. It is meant to “move the masses” because it is uniquely better than the competition. 

Although the USP isn’t necessarily “copy”, we do use it as a framework to base our copy around. 

Components of a Unique Selling Proposition

Take your target audience, figure out their big problem, explain how you solve their problem, highlight the big benefits of your solution, and finally define your promise. You’ll want to combine all of that, rework it, and turn it into an easy-to-digest proposition.

You can use the following framework to build your USP. 

Our [company / product / service] is the only one that helps [your customer] solve [their specific problem] by [unique promise or benefit].

Where To Use Your Unique Selling Proposition

Before you start building a unique selling proposition (USP), it’s important to know where and when you can use the USP. Copywriters use USPs on each advertisement, promotion, or sales letter. In short, your USP is the reason why the customer needs to buy the product or service for a very specific benefit. It helps the copywriter keep focused on that benefit as they are writing the copy. 

Although the USP isn’t necessarily “copy”, we do use it as a framework to base our copy around. As a result, you will see a lot of USPs in the headlines or at least the first few lines of copy.

Examples of Well-Executed USPs

Here are a couple examples of well-executed USPs. 

TOMS Roasting Co. 

You thought they only sold shoes! TOMS has been a long standing, philanthropic company that believes in One for One®. Their roasting company is no exception. Their USP is that in return for your coffee purchase, they provide safe water. Can you name another company that is doing that? It’s unique and admirable. 

Building a Unique Selling Proposition

Away Travel 

Away luggage creates suitcases and other travel products. This USP doesn’t directly talk about what they do in addition to creating these products – “building peace in areas of conflict around the world”. But they are unique in that they see travel as something greater.

Building a Unique Selling Proposition

ClickUp

“One app to replace them all.” It’s unique. It’s a huge selling point because if you’re anything like me, you are trying to simplify how you work – and consequently, the number of apps you use. 

Building a Unique Selling Proposition

Steps to Building a Unique Selling Proposition

Building a unique selling proposition (USP) may not be easy. It needs to be strong enough to influence a large number of people, but specific enough to be consumed in one bite. It’s the framework for an entire piece of copy. In this blog, we’ve broken down the steps to help you get started. 

1. Who Is Your Target Audience?

This is always always always our number 1 question… Who is the customer or your target audience? If you don’t know that, then you need to figure it out. 

Remember, there is no business without a customer. It’s imperative that you do not skip this step. 

For a wellness coach, it could be a college student that is experiencing new pain and wants to find a solution. 

For a corporate event planner, it could be a real estate broker that sells luxury condos and wants to woo his clients. 

Whoever it is, know who that person is. It will not be everyone, and that’s totally okay. You can scale later. 

2. What Is Their Problem? 

Now that you know who they are, it’s time to assess what their big problem is. What is the one thing that they are missing or gripe about?

For example, a real estate brokerage firm targets first time homeowners. New home buyer’s big pain points are that they have no home buying experience and fear they may invest in a bad property. That fear is crippling, so they don’t buy at the right time or at all.

3. How Does Your Product / Service Solve Their Problem? 

Next, assess how your product or service solves that problem. In the same example above, a real estate brokerage firm could have a program specifically tailored to educating first time home buyers. 

What features and benefits help you solve that problem? 

4. How Are You Unique?

The key of a USP is the unique aspect. Your competition must not offer the same benefits as you because you’re… Unique! Why are you different? How are you special? These questions are helpful when defining your uniqueness.

5. Combine Those Answers In An Easy-To-Digest Sentence

You may be thinking… How am I going to combine all of this into one sentence? You’re killing me, Lauren. Okay, I get it. I said that too when I developed my first USP. But the big reason why you need an easy-to-digest sentence is because you want anyone in your company to immediately recite it without tripping over words. 

Employees Need to Memorize the USP

You also want your customers and prospective customers to buy-in quickly and even memorize it themselves. 

Customers Need to Memorize the USP

Think about it this way… Your customer isn’t that valuable to you unless they’ve bought from you two, three, four, or more times. Right? The more they buy from you, the more valuable they are to you because your customer acquisition costs are decreasing. 

The relationship goal all companies want to reach is when your customers are advocating for you and eventually promoting your product or service. This is GOLD. Your customer, when they reach this stage, are your free promoters. PLUS their network are more likely to buy from your company because they trust that person. 

That’s why it has to be digestible and memorable.

Conclusion Building a Unique Selling Proposition

Every company has a unique selling proposition – whether they have defined it yet or not. If you need help building your unique selling proposition, we just released a 1-hour Brainstorm Session that includes an entire action plan based on our conversation. And it’s completely customizable. Take advantage of this offer here.

Focus Your Copy On Conversation & Conversion

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Content Is NOT King In Marketing

In accounting, we hear the phrase “cash is king”. And in marketing, we hear “content is king.”

I’d like to challenge that premise with content is NOT king in marketing.

Okay, that’s a pretty big claim, but I have reasoning! 

You see there will be more pieces of information produced in 2020 than in all history before (TechJury). Consequently, there will be so much content that competition for eyes to read it will become increasingly more difficult. Marketing should not just be about content marketing or producing content. 

But digital marketers are continuing to advise companies to work on their content marketing strategies to reach more leads. Let’s get into why content is NOT king in marketing.

Why Content Is NOT King in Marketing

Content is not king in marketing because content alone does not address this one thing… Your customer! 

In fact, your content is just information clutter in the space of overwhelming data. It’s absolutely useless, time-consuming, and a waste of money… if it isn’t about your customer.

Your customer is and must be king.

Customer centricity in your business is the difference between a flourishing business and a bankrupt business.

Making Your Customer King In Your Content Marketing

If your customer isn’t the center of your business, then you have no business – or at least it won’t last much longer. They have to be the center of your business life – marketing, processes, accounting, sales, operations, etc. 

If one area of your business does not serve your customer, then you are either not making it easy for your customer to do business with you, or you are not adding the value you should be. The customer, more than likely, has dozens or hundreds of other options to choose from. If they realize this, they’ll leave you high and dry. 

We are a firm believer of putting the customer first. Before we even start discussing the product, we talk about the customer. Your product must solve your customer’s problem.

Examples of Companies Making Their Customer King

I could tell you over and over again that you need to be customer centric, but what does it actually mean? 

We’ve compiled a few examples of companies or organizations that are in completely different industries with different products. I’m a fan of all these organizations because they make their customer king!

Google

Every year, Google makes approximately 300 adjustments to their algorithm. Heck, SEO companies have a completely different job every two years because the algorithm is completely different. Why does Google do that? They listen to their customers. 

They act as a thought leader and standardize what is quality, relevant and trustworthy. Why do you think that Google is an adjective, noun, and a verb?

In the same way, you cannot remain the same. Your customer sure doesn’t stay the same. If you haven’t changed, then you need to adjust yourself.

Costco

Costco – the member warehouse club – scores big on being all about the customer. heir mantra for operations is: “keep costs down and pass the savings on to our members” (Costco). If that doesn’t scream customer is king, then nothing does! 

Facebook

Facebook has recently changed their algorithms to put more posts and groups in front of users. Although this may hurt advertisers, Facebook is putting their users first – even if they aren’t spending money on the platform. If Facebook doesn’t have users, they offer zero value to their advertisers.

Chick-fil-A

“My pleasure.” This organization has a product so simple that it should be so easy to sell – chicken sandwiches. But Chick-fil-A takes their customer service to a whole other level. They greet you, thank you, serve you faithfully, and make your experience top notch. There’s been stories of team members jumping out of the drive through window to help a choking patron, restaurants opening outside of business hours to serve communities destroyed in natural disasters, and going above and beyond.

“We should be about more than just selling chicken. We should be a part of our customers’ lives and the communities in which we serve.”

S. TRUETT CATHY

That’s customer focus.

Houston Astros Baseball Team

I once heard Reid Ryan, the President of Business Operations for the Astros, speak at a luncheon. He said something that spoke to the very customer-centric culture built in to their organization. They take all their analytics and have crafted specific “nights” for their different customer personas. As a result, they have…

  • Tuesday Dollar Dog Nights ($1 hot dogs) 
  • Friday Night Fireworks
  • Saturday Kroger Family Nights (with food specials)
  • Faith and Family Nights

And that’s just them serving their ticket holders! The players add to the customer experience by going out into the community, interacting with fans, and creating an experience for fans (hello World Series!). 

Go ‘Stos!

via GIPHY

Making Customers King In Your Company

Your company may be different. I want to challenge you today to write 5 areas where your customers interact with your company. Then for each of those areas, write 5 improvements you could implement. 

Start by asking questions like…

  • Does this add value to my customer?
  • Why do my customers keep coming back to me?
  • How does this impact my customer? 
  • Does my customer even care?

If you need help transforming your perspective and becoming customer centric, click the button below to get connected with your full-service copywriting team.

Focus Your Copy On Conversation & Conversion

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